Loss Of An Arm Claims Guide – How Much Compensation For The Loss Of An Arm? – Calculate Amounts Payouts

Loss of arm compensation claims guide

Loss of arm compensation claims guide

Most of us take the use of our limbs for granted. We use them in everyday life without ever thinking about them. However, suffering the loss of an arm or other limb soon proves how dependent we are on them. If you’re involved in an accident, caused by somebody else’s negligence which results in your arm being amputated, you could be eligible for compensation. In this guide we’re going to look at when an arm amputation claim could be made, when somebody else might be responsible and how much compensation you could be entitled to.

Our advisors are specially trained to offer free legal advice about claiming. They can also assess your claim for free and with no obligation. If they believe your case is suitable for a compensation claim, they could introduce you to a specialist no win no fee solicitor to handle your claim. If you’d like to begin a claim right away, please call our advisors on 0800 073 8801.

Alternatively, to find our more about loss of limb compensation claims, please continue reading.

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A Guide To Claiming Compensation For The Loss Of An Arm

The loss of an arm can no doubt be referred to as a life-changing injury. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a arm amputation at the shoulder, a lower arm amputation or a broken arm amputation, the victim will suffer both physically and mentally because of their injuries. Therefore, it’s only right to consider a compensation claim if the accident which led to the amputation was caused by somebody else. For a solicitor to consider taking on your claim though, you’ll need to be able to prove that:

  • Somebody who owed you a duty of care was negligent;
  • Which caused an accident to happen; and
  • That accident led to the amputation of your arm.

We’ll provide some examples of the different types of arm amputation accident throughout this guide.

Another thing to consider when starting a claim is the personal injury claims time limit. This is usually a 3-year period from the date of the accident. It can however start later than that if the victim isn’t aware of their injuries until a later date.

Our solicitors are able to help you make any serious injury claim including one for the loss of an arm. When you’ve finished reading this guide, if you believe you could be eligible to claim, please call the number at the top of the screen. We’ll assess your claim for free and let you know your chances of successfully claiming compensation.

What Is The Loss Of An Arm?

When we talk about the loss of an arm, we’re usually talking about the traumatic loss of an arm caused during an accident. Over the coming sections of this guide we’ll look at accidents which can lead to the loss of an arm such as a road traffic accident, an accident at work, medical negligence and injuries caused during service to the armed forces.

The extent of the impact of an arm amputation will depend on which arm it affects. A left arm amputation or right arm amputation will affect people differently depending on which is their dominant arm.

Before we move on to discuss the accidents which could cause the loss of an arm, here are the different types of amputation that can occur:

  • Wrist disarticulation – This amputation means the hand and wrist joint is amputated.
  • Below elbow amputation – an amputation or partial amputation of the forearm below the elbow.
  • Elbow disarticulation – The amputation of the lower arm at the elbow joint.
  • Above elbow – This is where the arm is amputated above the elbow but below the shoulder.
  • Shoulder disarticulation – The complete removal of the arm, shoulder blade and collarbone.

There’s no doubt that any type of arm amputation can lead to a serious injury claim if it is caused by somebody else. Therefore, if you’d like to discuss making a claim, please get in touch with an advisor today.

Types Of Accident Which Could Lead To The Loss Of An Arm

Over the coming sections of this guide, we’re going to take a look at different scenarios which could lead to an arm amputation claim. Don’t worry if you don’t see the type of accident you were involved with. So long as the accident was caused by somebody else’s negligence, we could help you claim. The following are just some common examples of the types of accidents which lead to a claim.

Claim For The Loss Of An Arm Due To Medical Negligence

All medical professionals have a duty of care to protect the well being of their patients. This means that they need to follow best practice, explain any potential risks and use the correct equipment during any treatment. Medical negligence claims are possible against the NHS as well as private healthcare providers.

If you’ve been involved in surgery where an avoidable mistake has led to your arm being amputated, then you could be entitled to sue the surgeon or hospital. You could also be able to claim if a misdiagnosis prevented you from receiving treatment earlier that might’ve saved your arm.

Claim For The Loss Of An Arm In A Road Traffic Accident

When a road traffic accident occurs, an arm could be crushed or trapped, and the damage is so severe that the only option is to amputate the arm. It’s also possible to suffer a traumatic amputation of the arm at the scene of the accident.

As all road users owe each other a duty of care to protect each other by driving carefully, you could claim compensation if the car crash was caused by another driver’s negligent act. Claims might be possible where the other driver was driving carelessly, was speeding, was under the influence of drink or drugs or any other form of dangerous driving.

Our solicitors specialise in road traffic accident claims and could help you even if you’re involved in a hit and run accident or the driver has no insurance. Please call for further details.

Claim For The Loss Of An Arm In An Armed Forces Accident

It’s quite obvious that serving on the front line for the armed forces is a dangerous role and accidents and injuries will happen. However, as an employer, the military has a duty of care to ensure the safety of their staff while not completing combat missions. Also, during combat, you should be provided with the correct equipment and have been trained properly on how to use it.

If it can be shown that the armed forces were negligent in some way, then you could claim compensation for the loss of an arm. As these can be quite complex cases to prove, we do advise that you have a specialist solicitor working for you. Please discuss how we could help by calling the number at the top of the page.

Claim For The Loss Of An Arm In An Accident At Work

All employers in the UK, whether large or small, have a duty of care to try and keep staff safe while at work. That could mean while working in a factory, warehouse or office as well as working at remote locations.

Under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, employers should perform regular risk assessments to identify any dangers. Then they should take steps to remove the danger. These could include:

  • Ensuring machinery is maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Training staff adequately.
  • Providing safety equipment.
  • Ensuring any faults are repaired in a timely manner.

If an accident at work occurs because one of the above hasn’t happened, you might be entitled to sue your employer. They are not allowed to discipline you for making a claim, so long as its an honest claim, so don’t be afraid to claim the compensation you could be entitled to.

Further Symptoms Which May Be Related To The Loss Of An Arm

In some cases, the pain of an arm amputation will fade over time. For others will last for the rest of their life and ‘ghost pain’ can occur as well. However, as well as the pain, there are other psychological symptoms which could be suffered. These include:

  • Flashbacks of the accident occurring.
  • Depression and anxiety.
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

These, as well as other psychological issues could all be included within your claim if they are diagnosed by a doctor and linked to your accident or injuries.

What Steps Should I Take If I Lost A Limb In A Traumatic Accident?

If you’re involved in an accident which causes the loss of an arm, providing evidence to show what happened could make the difference between receiving compensation or not.

Obviously, you’re unlikely to be able to do too much yourself because of your injuries. However, if you’re with somebody else at the time, they could help you gather important evidence. The steps you should try to take include:

  • Photographing the scene of the accident. Try to capture the cause of the accident and take pictures before anything is removed from the scene where possible.
  • Obtain copies of medical records from the hospital. These can be used as evidence to show the extent of your injuries.
  • Get witness details and statements of what they saw.
  • Report the accident to police if it’s a road traffic accident. In workplace accidents, ensure the accident is recorded in an accident report book.
  • When possible, photograph your injuries.
  • Write down what happened. It’s very easy to forget details over time so write down what you remember as soon as possible.

Loss Of An Arm Personal Injury Claims Calculator

We’re often asked questions like, “How much compensation do you get for losing an arm?”, but in reality, it’s not that simple as a compensation claim is made up of a number of different elements. Until we’ve assessed your claim and understood how you’ve been affected by your injuries, it’s quite hard to provide an accurate estimate.

However, we can provide the personal injury claims calculator table below. It shows the compensation paid for some injuries. Remember, this is just one part of the claim, we’ll cover others in the next section.

InjurySeverityCompensation RangeAdditional Notes
Loss of a armCan be £1 Million Plus if large loss of earnings. Check with a advisor.Check with one of our advisors future loss of earnings can be huge.
Loss of both arms£225,960 to £281,520This type of injury will cause somebody who has full conciousness to feel completely helpless.
Arm amputated at the shoulder (single arm)Not less than £128,710The complete removal of a single arm at the shoulder.
Above-elbow amputation (single arm)£102,890 to £122,860The lower end of this range covers amputations at the elbow. The higher end covers amputation which leaves a shorter stump making the use of a prosthetic limb difficult.
Below-elbow amputation (single arm)£90,250 to £102,890Covers amputations through the forearm and where severe pain (including phantom pain) occurs.
Arm injurySevere£90,250 to £122,860Injuries where an amputation doesn't need to be performed but the result is effectively the same as if it had.
Arm injurySerious£36,770 to £56,180Where there is a serious fracture in one or both arms which causes a significant and permanent disability.

You may notice that the amount of an amputation compensation payout varies depending on the severity of your injury. That’s why it’s important to have a specialist solicitor on your side. Our solicitors use medical records, as well as reports from independent doctors, to try and ensure the severity of your injuries is clear. They do this to try and ensure you receive the maximum amount of compensation that your injuries deserve.

Special Damages Which Could Be Claimed For A Traumatic Arm Amputation

In the previous section, we provided examples of ‘general damages’ that a personal injury solicitor can claim for. This is used to cover the pain and suffering your injuries cause. However, that is just one part of the claim. Your solicitor can also include financial losses, known as special damages, within the claim too. Some examples of special damages include:

  • Loss of Earnings.
    While you’re recovering, you’re likely to need time off from work. If that means you lose some of your wages, then you could claim them back. Also, in cases where the loss of an arm affects your ability to work altogether or you can’t complete the work as you used to, you could claim for future lost income too.
  • Care Costs.
    In some cases, amputation compensation claims can include the cost of a professional carer to help you while recovering. You could also ask for compensation if a loved one or friend has cared for you during this time.
  • Medical Costs.
    You’ll usually receive free treatment from the NHS for your injuries. However, that doesn’t prevent the costs of prescriptions, over the counter medicines and other treatments from building up. That means you could also be entitled to claim these costs back.
  • Home Adaptations.
    Some injuries, such as a full arm amputation of your dominant arm, might mean changes to your home are needed to help you function. Therefore, it might be possible to claim for the cost of this work.
  • Travelling Costs.

It’s likely that if you’ve lost your arm, that you might not be able to drive for a while (or ever again in more serious cases). Therefore, the costs of alternative travel arrangements or modifications could be considered in your claim too.

Evidence For Special Damages

It’s really important that you can provide evidence to backup any special damages claim. We recommend that you keep hold of receipts, bank statements and you keep a log of spending linked to your injuries. Importantly, we recommend that you check with your solicitor before committing to an expense. They should be able to confirm whether you’re likely to be compensated. They may also be able to check with the defendant’s insurer for you.

No Win No Fee Claims For The Loss Of An Arm

It’s quite common for people to worry about the cost of hiring a personal injury lawyer. It could even result in them not claiming at all. To make things easier, our solicitors offer a no win no fee service for all claims that they take on. We believe this reduces the financial risk involved with a claim, allows more people to do so and also reduces a lot of the associated stress.

No win no fee agreements are legally known as Conditional Fee Agreements or CFAs. When your solicitor agrees to take on your case, they’ll provide you with a CFA.

It’s a really important document because it explains, in black and white, that you don’t have to pay the solicitor’s fees unless they achieve compensation for you. Also, it explains the success you’ll pay if they do win the case.

The good thing about success fees is that they are a percentage of your compensation that’s deducted to cover the solicitor’s fees. This means you don’t need to have the funds available to pay the fee yourself.

To find out whether you could make a personal injury claim on a no win no fee basis, please call our team of advisors today.

How We Could Help You Claim For The Traumatic Loss Of A Limb

Now that you understand when you could claim for the loss of an arm, we hope you’d like to begin your claim with us. Here are some reasons why we think you should:

  • Our claims line is open 24-hours a day, every day of the week.
  • We offer a no obligation assessment of your claim and also free legal advice.
  • Our advisors will work at your pace without pressuring you.
  • If your claim is taken on it will be on a no win no fee basis.
  • Our team of solicitors have up to 30 years personal injury claims experience.
  • Previous clients have provided excellent feedback.
  • Our solicitors always try to ensure that our clients receive the maximum amount of compensation for their injuries.

Start Your Claim For The Loss Of An Arm

We hope that you’re now ready to begin a claim with Accident Claims UK. If so, here are the ways in which you can get in touch:

Whichever method you use to contact us, our advisors will act sensitively and professionally when assessing your claim. There will be no pressure from us and you’re under no obligation to continue. We will provide free legal advice about claiming for the loss of an arm whether you decide to continue or not.

Essential References

Thanks for reading this guide about claiming for the loss of an arm. Hopefully you now have all of the information you require. To assist you further, we’ve linked to some more resources that we hope you’ll find useful.

The Health And Safety At Work Act 1974 – Information regarding the legislation that could be used if you’ve suffered an arm amputation accident at work.

Armed Forces Claims – A government guide about claiming against the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme if you’ve lost a limb while serving.

Road Traffic Accident Statistics – This government resource provides information about injuries caused by a car accident and other RTAs.

Making An Amputation Claim – A more generic look at amputation compensation claims, not just the loss of an arm.

Accident At Work Claims – If you’ve suffered a traumatic arm amputation due to a workplace accident, then this guide could help you work out if you can sue your employer.

Medical Negligence Claims – This guide will explain whether you could make an arm amputation claim against a medical professional following clinical negligence.

Medical Resources And Support For Amputees

Finally, here are some medical resources and support groups that you may find useful:

NHS Amputation Guide – This guide from the NHS explains why arm amputation surgery needs to take place, how it’s done and arm amputation recovery methods you can use.

Limbless Association – A UK charity offering support those who have suffered the loss of an arm as well as other limbs.